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The Slave Ship

The Slave Ship
  • Author : Marcus Rediker
  • Publisher :Unknown
  • Release Date :2007-10-04
  • Total pages :448
  • ISBN : 1440620849
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Summary : “Masterly.”—Adam Hochschild, The New York Times Book Review In this widely praised history of an infamous institution, award-winning scholar Marcus Rediker shines a light into the darkest corners of the British and American slave ships of the eighteenth century. Drawing on thirty years of research in maritime archives, court records, diaries, and firsthand accounts, The Slave Ship is riveting and sobering in its revelations, reconstructing in chilling detail a world nearly lost to history: the "floating dungeons" at the forefront of the birth of African American culture.

The Slave Ship Wanderer

The Slave Ship Wanderer
  • Author : Tom Henderson Wells
  • Publisher :Unknown
  • Release Date :2009-07-01
  • Total pages :116
  • ISBN : 9780820334578
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Summary : Published in 1967, The Slave Ship Wanderer details the journey of the elegant yacht that was used to secretly land a cargo of 400 enslaved Africans off the coast of Jekyll Island, Georgia, in 1859. It was the last successful large-scale importation of slaves into the United States, and it was done in defiance of a federal law. The Wanderer's crew had out-run ships of both the British and American Navies and the creators of the plot went on to evade federal marshals as they attempted to sell the slaves throughout the South. Tom Henderson Wells documents the story behind the prominent Georgian, Charles Lamar, who engineered the plot. He also explores the regional and national attention the story received and the failure to prosecute those involved. In tracing the story of the Wanderer, Wells provides insight into the heated political and social climate of the South on the verge of secession.

The Slave Ship, Memory and the Origin of Modernity

The Slave Ship, Memory and the Origin of Modernity
  • Author : Martyn Hudson
  • Publisher :Unknown
  • Release Date :2017-05-15
  • Total pages :160
  • ISBN : 9781317015918
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Summary : Traces; slave names, the islands and cities into which we are born, our musics and rhythms, our genetic compositions, our stories of our lost utopias and the atrocities inflicted upon our ancestors, by our ancestors, the social structure of our cities, the nature of our diasporas, the scars inflicted by history. These are all the remnants of the middle passage of the slave ship for those in the multiple diasporas of the globe today, whose complex histories were shaped by that journey. Whatever remnants that once existed in the subjectivities and collectivities upon which slavery was inflicted has long passed. But there are hints in material culture, genetic and cultural transmissions and objects that shape certain kinds of narratives - this is how we know ourselves and how we tell our stories. This path-breaking book uncovers the significance of the memory of the slave ship for modernity as well as its role in the cultural production of modernity. By so doing, it examines methods of ethnography for historical events and experiences and offers a sociology and a history from below of the slave experience. The arguments in this book show the way for using memory studies to undermine contemporary slavery.

Dreams of Africa in Alabama

Dreams of Africa in Alabama
  • Author : Sylviane A. Diouf
  • Publisher :Unknown
  • Release Date :2007-03-09
  • Total pages :340
  • ISBN : 9780195311044
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Summary : Reconstructs the lives of 110 men, women, and children from Benin and Nigeria who arrived in Alabama in 1860, deported to the United States as slaves more than fifty years after the abolition of the international slave trade.

The Voyage of the Slave Ship Hare

The Voyage of the Slave Ship Hare
  • Author : Sean M. Kelley
  • Publisher :Unknown
  • Release Date :2016-02-23
  • Total pages :304
  • ISBN : 9781469627694
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Summary : From 1754 to 1755, the slave ship Hare completed a journey from Newport, Rhode Island, to Sierra Leone and back to the United States—a journey that transformed more than seventy Africans into commodities, condemning some to death and the rest to a life of bondage in North America. In this engaging narrative, Sean Kelley painstakingly reconstructs this tumultuous voyage, detailing everything from the identities of the captain and crew to their wild encounters with inclement weather, slave traders, and near-mutiny. But most importantly, Kelley tracks the cohort of slaves aboard the Hare from their purchase in Africa to their sale in South Carolina. In tracing their complete journey, Kelley provides rare insight into the communal lives of slaves and sheds new light on the African diaspora and its influence on the formation of African American culture. In this immersive exploration, Kelley connects the story of enslaved people in the United States to their origins in Africa as never before. Told uniquely from the perspective of one particular voyage, this book brings a slave ship's journey to life, giving us one of the clearest views of the eighteenth-century slave trade.

Slave Ship

Slave Ship
  • Author : K. W. Jeter
  • Publisher :Unknown
  • Release Date :1998
  • Total pages :324
  • ISBN : 9780553578881
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Summary : The bounty hunters introduced in "Shadows of the Empire", and who returned in "The Mandalorian Armor", come to life in this compelling new novel as Boba Fett battles a conspiracy, Bossk struggles to rule the other bounty hunters, and Kuat fights the maneuverings of Prince Xizor.

Slave Ship Sailors and Their Captive Cargoes, 1730-1807

Slave Ship Sailors and Their Captive Cargoes, 1730-1807
  • Author : Emma Christopher
  • Publisher :Unknown
  • Release Date :2006-04-03
  • Total pages :241
  • ISBN : 9780521861625
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Summary : An examination of the lives of those laboring aboard British and North American slave ships.

The Slave Ship Fredensborg

The Slave Ship Fredensborg
  • Author : Leif Svalesen,Karin Barber
  • Publisher :Unknown
  • Release Date :2000
  • Total pages :243
  • ISBN : 0253337771
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Summary : Provides details of life aboard the Danish slave ship Fredensborg, which sank off the coast of Norway in 1768.

The Last Slave Ships

The Last Slave Ships
  • Author : John Harris
  • Publisher :Unknown
  • Release Date :2020-11-24
  • Total pages :312
  • ISBN : 9780300247336
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Summary : A stunning behind-the-curtain look into the last years of the illegal transatlantic slave trade in the United States "Engrossing. . . . Astonishingly well-documented. . . . A signal contribution to U.S. antebellum historiography. Highly recommended for U.S. Middle Period, African American, and Civil War historians, and for all general readers."--Library Journal, Starred Review Long after the transatlantic slave trade was officially outlawed in the early nineteenth century by every major slave trading nation, merchants based in the United States were still sending hundreds of illegal slave ships from American ports to the African coast. The key instigators were slave traders who moved to New York City after the shuttering of the massive illegal slave trade to Brazil in 1850. These traffickers were determined to make Lower Manhattan a key hub in the illegal slave trade to Cuba. In conjunction with allies in Africa and Cuba, they ensnared around two hundred thousand African men, women, and children during the 1850s and 1860s. John Harris explores how the U.S. government went from ignoring, and even abetting, this illegal trade to helping to shut it down completely in 1867.

Committed to Memory

Committed to Memory
  • Author : Cheryl Finley
  • Publisher :Unknown
  • Release Date :2018-07-03
  • Total pages :320
  • ISBN : 9780691136844
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Summary : How an eighteenth-century engraving of the slave ship became a cultural icon of black resistance, identity, and remembrance One of the most iconic images of slavery is a schematic wood engraving depicting the human cargo hold of a slave ship. First published by British abolitionists in 1788, it exposed this widespread commercial practice for what it really was--shocking, immoral, barbaric, unimaginable. Printed as handbills and broadsides, the image Cheryl Finley has termed the "slave ship icon" was easily reproduced, and by the end of the eighteenth century it was circulating by the tens of thousands around the Atlantic rim. Committed to Memory provides the first in-depth look at how this artifact of the fight against slavery became an enduring symbol of black resistance, identity, and remembrance. Finley traces how the slave ship icon became a powerful tool in the hands of British and American abolitionists, and how its radical potential was rediscovered in the twentieth century by black artists, activists, writers, filmmakers, and curators. Finley offers provocative new insights into the works of Amiri Baraka, Romare Bearden, Betye Saar, and many others. She demonstrates how the icon was transformed into poetry, literature, visual art, sculpture, performance, and film--and became a medium through which diasporic Africans have reasserted their common identity and memorialized their ancestors. Beautifully illustrated, Committed to Memory features works from around the world, taking readers from the United States and England to West Africa and the Caribbean. It shows how contemporary black artists and their allies have used this iconic eighteenth-century engraving to reflect on the trauma of slavery and come to terms with its legacy.

The Slave Ship Clotilda and the Making of AfricaTown, USA

The Slave Ship Clotilda and the Making of AfricaTown, USA
  • Author : Natalie S. Robertson
  • Publisher :Unknown
  • Release Date :2008
  • Total pages :256
  • ISBN : UOM:39015077605510
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Summary : Shows how African captives endured capture, imprisonment, the middle passage, and slavery in America only to persevere and found a free and still-vibrant community in America.

The Painter

The Painter
  • Author : Rebecca Lenkiewicz
  • Publisher :Unknown
  • Release Date :2011-01-20
  • Total pages :80
  • ISBN : 9780571276905
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Summary : The fashionables, they tell me their artistic opinion. They just want to know if a painting is hot. Whether it will gain. And then they criticise anyone who is different, anyone who's not on the 'direct route' to taste. Fuck 'em. Turner, the English romantic landscape artist and 'painter of light', was a man obsessed. Intensely prolific he was heavily reliant on his father, deeply affected by his mother's rejections and isolated from the usual breed of artists. English painting is dead. It's dealers making fortunes out of sentimental dross. Dogs. Cherubs. The Painter by Rebecca Lenkiewicz premiered at the Arcola Theatre, London, in January 2011 in the production which marked the opening of its new premises on Ashton Street.

Barracoon

Barracoon
  • Author : Zora Neale Hurston
  • Publisher :Unknown
  • Release Date :2018-05-08
  • Total pages :208
  • ISBN : 9780062748225
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Summary : New York Times Bestseller • TIME Magazine’s Best Nonfiction Book of 2018 • New York Public Library’s Best Book of 2018 • NPR’s Book Concierge Best Book of 2018 • Economist Book of the Year • SELF.com’s Best Books of 2018 • Audible’s Best of the Year • BookRiot’s Best Audio Books of 2018 • The Atlantic’s Books Briefing: History, Reconsidered • Atlanta Journal Constitution, Best Southern Books 2018 • The Christian Science Monitor’s Best Books 2018 • “A profound impact on Hurston’s literary legacy.”—New York Times “One of the greatest writers of our time.”—Toni Morrison “Zora Neale Hurston’s genius has once again produced a Maestrapiece.”—Alice Walker A major literary event: a newly published work from the author of the American classic Their Eyes Were Watching God, with a foreword from Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alice Walker, brilliantly illuminates the horror and injustices of slavery as it tells the true story of one of the last-known survivors of the Atlantic slave trade—abducted from Africa on the last "Black Cargo" ship to arrive in the United States. In 1927, Zora Neale Hurston went to Plateau, Alabama, just outside Mobile, to interview eighty-six-year-old Cudjo Lewis. Of the millions of men, women, and children transported from Africa to America as slaves, Cudjo was then the only person alive to tell the story of this integral part of the nation’s history. Hurston was there to record Cudjo’s firsthand account of the raid that led to his capture and bondage fifty years after the Atlantic slave trade was outlawed in the United States. In 1931, Hurston returned to Plateau, the African-centric community three miles from Mobile founded by Cudjo and other former slaves from his ship. Spending more than three months there, she talked in depth with Cudjo about the details of his life. During those weeks, the young writer and the elderly formerly enslaved man ate peaches and watermelon that grew in the backyard and talked about Cudjo’s past—memories from his childhood in Africa, the horrors of being captured and held in a barracoon for selection by American slavers, the harrowing experience of the Middle Passage packed with more than 100 other souls aboard the Clotilda, and the years he spent in slavery until the end of the Civil War. Based on those interviews, featuring Cudjo’s unique vernacular, and written from Hurston’s perspective with the compassion and singular style that have made her one of the preeminent American authors of the twentieth-century, Barracoon masterfully illustrates the tragedy of slavery and of one life forever defined by it. Offering insight into the pernicious legacy that continues to haunt us all, black and white, this poignant and powerful work is an invaluable contribution to our shared history and culture.

Voyage of The Slave Ship

Voyage of The Slave Ship
  • Author : Stephen J. May
  • Publisher :Unknown
  • Release Date :2014-05-19
  • Total pages :216
  • ISBN : 9781476615509
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Summary : Set against the backdrop of the Atlantic slave trade, this book traces the development, exhibition and final disposition of one of J.M.W. Turner’s greatest and most memorable paintings. Queen Victoria’s reign (1837–1901) in Great Britain produced unprecedented wealth and luxury. For artists and writers this period was particularly noteworthy in that it gave them the opportunity to both praise their country and criticize its overreaching ambition. At the forefront of these artists and writers were men like J.M.W. Turner, Dickens, Thackeray, Tennyson, and John Ruskin, who created some of the most enduring works of art while exposing many of the social evils of their native land. The book also analyzes the man behind the painting. Aloof, gruff and mysterious, Turner resisted success. He worked as a solitary artist, traveling to Europe, sketching towns along the way, studying nature, and transferring his experiences to finished paintings upon his return to London. The son of a barber, he grew up in London and experienced many of the social issues of the age: slavery and freedom, poverty in the slums, monarchy and democracy, stability and anarchy. He was a poet of nature and its innumerable mysteries.

Shackles From the Deep

Shackles From the Deep
  • Author : Michael Cottman
  • Publisher :Unknown
  • Release Date :2017-01-03
  • Total pages :128
  • ISBN : 9781426326677
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Summary : A pile of lime-encrusted shackles discovered on the seafloor in the remains of a ship called the Henrietta Marie, lands Michael Cottman, a Washington, D.C.-based journalist and avid scuba diver, in the middle of an amazing journey that stretches across three continents, from foundries and tombs in England, to slave ports on the shores of West Africa, to present-day Caribbean plantations. This is more than just the story of one ship – it's the untold story of millions of people taken as captives to the New World. Told from the author's perspective, this book introduces young readers to the wonders of diving, detective work, and discovery, while shedding light on the history of slavery.

Recaptured Africans

Recaptured Africans
  • Author : Sharla M. Fett
  • Publisher :Unknown
  • Release Date :2016-11-23
  • Total pages :312
  • ISBN : 9781469630038
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Summary : In the years just before the Civil War, during the most intensive phase of American slave-trade suppression, the U.S. Navy seized roughly 2,000 enslaved Africans from illegal slave ships and brought them into temporary camps at Key West and Charleston. In this study, Sharla Fett reconstructs the social world of these "recaptives" and recounts the relationships they built to survive the holds of slave ships, American detention camps, and, ultimately, a second transatlantic voyage to Liberia. Fett also demonstrates how the presence of slave-trade refugees in southern ports accelerated heated arguments between divergent antebellum political movements--from abolitionist human rights campaigns to slave-trade revivalism--that used recaptives to support their claims about slavery, slave trading, and race. By focusing on shipmate relations rather than naval exploits or legal trials, and by analyzing the experiences of both children and adults of varying African origins, Fett provides the first history of U.S. slave-trade suppression centered on recaptive Africans themselves. In so doing, she examines the state of "recaptivity" as a distinctive variant of slave-trade captivity and situates the recaptives' story within the broader diaspora of "Liberated Africans" throughout the Atlantic world.

Stalin's Slave Ships

Stalin's Slave Ships
  • Author : Martin J. Bollinger
  • Publisher :Unknown
  • Release Date :2003
  • Total pages :217
  • ISBN : 0275981002
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Summary : Between 1932 and 1953, a fleet of ordinary cargo ships was pressed into extraordinary service. The fleet's task was to relocate approximately one-million forced laborers to the Soviet Gulag in Kolyma, located along the Arctic Circle in far northeastern Siberia. Bollinger presents the often-horrific stories of the Gulag fleet and its passengers and reveals the unwitting role of the United States government in the operation.

Sacred Hunger

Sacred Hunger
  • Author : Barry Unsworth
  • Publisher :Unknown
  • Release Date :2012-01-10
  • Total pages :336
  • ISBN : 9780307948441
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Summary : Winner of the Booker Prize A historical novel set in the eighteenth century, Sacred Hunger is a stunning, engrossing exploration of power, domination, and greed in the British Empire as it entered fully into the slave trade and spread it throughout its colonies. Barry Unsworth follows the failing fortunes of William Kemp, a merchant pinning his last chance to a slave ship; his son who needs a fortune because he is in love with an upper-class woman; and his nephew who sails on the ship as its doctor because he has lost all he has loved. The voyage meets its demise when disease spreads among the slaves and the captain's drastic response provokes a mutiny. Joining together, the sailors and the slaves set up a secret, utopian society in the wilderness of Florida, only to await the vengeance of the single-minded, young Kemp.

From Slave Ship to Harvard

From Slave Ship to Harvard
  • Author : James H. Johnston
  • Publisher :Unknown
  • Release Date :2012-05-14
  • Total pages :337
  • ISBN : 9780823239528
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Summary : “Part historical narrative, part genealogical detective work,” this is the true story of an African American family in Maryland over six generations (Library Journal). Using diaries, court records, legal documents, books, paintings, photographs, and oral histories, From Slave Ship to Harvard traces a family—from the colonial period and the American Revolution through the Civil War to Harvard and finally today—forming a unique narrative of black struggle and achievement. Yarrow Mamout was an educated Muslim from Guinea, brought to Maryland on the slave ship Elijah. When he gained his freedom forty-four years later, he’d become so well known in the Georgetown section of Washington, DC, that he attracted the attention of the eminent portrait painter Charles Willson Peale, who captured Yarrow’s visage in the painting on the cover of this book. Yarrow’s immediate relatives—his sister, niece, wife, and son—were notable in their own right. His son married into the neighboring Turner family, and the farm community in western Maryland called Yarrowsburg was named for Yarrow Mamout’s daughter-in-law, Mary “Polly” Turner Yarrow. The Turner line ultimately produced Robert Turner Ford, who graduated from Harvard University in 1927. Just as Peale painted the portrait of Yarrow, James H. Johnston’s new book puts a face on slavery and paints the history of race in Maryland, where relationships between blacks and whites were far more complex than many realize. As this one family’s experience shows, individuals of both races repeatedly stepped forward to lessen divisions, and to move America toward the diverse society of today.

Dark Places of the Earth: The Voyage of the Slave Ship Antelope

Dark Places of the Earth: The Voyage of the Slave Ship Antelope
  • Author : Jonathan M. Bryant
  • Publisher :Unknown
  • Release Date :2015-07-13
  • Total pages :416
  • ISBN : 9781631490774
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Summary : Los Angeles Times Book Prize Finalist in History A dramatic work of historical detection illuminating one of the most significant—and long forgotten—Supreme Court cases in American history. In 1820, a suspicious vessel was spotted lingering off the coast of northern Florida, the Spanish slave ship Antelope. Since the United States had outlawed its own participation in the international slave trade more than a decade before, the ship's almost 300 African captives were considered illegal cargo under American laws. But with slavery still a critical part of the American economy, it would eventually fall to the Supreme Court to determine whether or not they were slaves at all, and if so, what should be done with them. Bryant describes the captives' harrowing voyage through waters rife with pirates and governed by an array of international treaties. By the time the Antelope arrived in Savannah, Georgia, the puzzle of how to determine the captives' fates was inextricably knotted. Set against the backdrop of a city in the grip of both the financial panic of 1819 and the lingering effects of an outbreak of yellow fever, Dark Places of the Earth vividly recounts the eight-year legal conflict that followed, during which time the Antelope's human cargo were mercilessly put to work on the plantations of Georgia, even as their freedom remained in limbo. When at long last the Supreme Court heard the case, Francis Scott Key, the legendary Georgetown lawyer and author of "The Star Spangled Banner," represented the Antelope captives in an epic courtroom battle that identified the moral and legal implications of slavery for a generation. Four of the six justices who heard the case, including Chief Justice John Marshall, owned slaves. Despite this, Key insisted that "by the law of nature all men are free," and that the captives should by natural law be given their freedom. This argument was rejected. The court failed Key, the captives, and decades of American history, siding with the rights of property over liberty and setting the course of American jurisprudence on these issues for the next thirty-five years. The institution of slavery was given new legal cover, and another brick was laid on the road to the Civil War. The stakes of the Antelope case hinged on nothing less than the central American conflict of the nineteenth century. Both disquieting and enlightening, Dark Places of the Earth restores the Antelope to its rightful place as one of the most tragic, influential, and unjustly forgotten episodes in American legal history.

The Empire of Necessity

The Empire of Necessity
  • Author : Greg Grandin
  • Publisher :Unknown
  • Release Date :2014-01-14
  • Total pages :384
  • ISBN : 9781429943178
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Summary : From the acclaimed author of Fordlandia, the story of a remarkable slave rebellion that illuminates America's struggle with slavery and freedom during the Age of Revolution and beyond One morning in 1805, off a remote island in the South Pacific, Captain Amasa Delano, a New England seal hunter, climbed aboard a distressed Spanish ship carrying scores of West Africans he thought were slaves. They weren't. Having earlier seized control of the vessel and slaughtered most of the crew, they were staging an elaborate ruse, acting as if they were humble servants. When Delano, an idealistic, anti-slavery republican, finally realized the deception, he responded with explosive violence. Drawing on research on four continents, The Empire of Necessity explores the multiple forces that culminated in this extraordinary event—an event that already inspired Herman Melville's masterpiece Benito Cereno. Now historian Greg Grandin, with the gripping storytelling that was praised in Fordlandia, uses the dramatic happenings of that day to map a new transnational history of slavery in the Americas, capturing the clash of peoples, economies, and faiths that was the New World in the early 1800s.